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2014

What Happened? - Diversity

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Please see below selected recent pre-2016 intelligence about diversity. This is a synthesis of major recent developments at corporates business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers.

 

December 2015

 

 

  • This year it is Finland that comes out as the best place to be a working woman, overtaking Sweden and knocking Norway off the top spot. It scores highest of the 28 countries in The Economist's index for the share of women in higher education (where their lead over males has grown), female labour-force participation and women taking the GMAT (business-school entrance exam), now over 50%. Finland has also increased its paid maternity leave by more than two weeks. Norway still has more women on company boards than other countries, thanks to a 40% mandatory quota that came into effect in 2008, but women's share of senior management jobs is slightly down on last year. While the share of parliamentary seats occupied by women in Norway and Finland has not changed, it fell slightly in Sweden, where the gender pay gap has also widened, and is now closer to the OECD average.

 

  • Deloitte LLP announced that Janet Foutty had been named chairman and chief executive officer of Deloitte Consulting LLP, effective January 1, 2016. Foutty succeeds Jim Moffatt, who has recently been named global consulting business leader, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited. Foutty, a principal with Deloitte Consulting LLP, was Deloitte’s federal practice leader and led more than 7,300 practitioners to help federal agencies transform into more efficient, effective organisations. She expanded the practice over the past three years. She previously led nearly 17,000 professionals in Deloitte Consulting LLP’s technology practice, where she achieved double-digit growth and launched several innovative businesses that address clients’ needs in evolving areas. During her 25-year tenure with Deloitte, Foutty has served clients across several industries and has raised visibility of thought leadership in key federal areas, including veterans’ issues, millennials in public service, and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.

 

  • Accenture named a record number of 723 people to managing director and senior managing director. “Each of these individuals brings the talent, leadership and experience that we need to serve our clients, develop our more than 358,000 people and run Accenture as a world-class business," said Pierre Nanterme, Accenture’s chairman and CEO. "These promotions reflect our commitment to career growth and opportunities for our people. We salute these executives and their contributions to Accenture – and to our clients." Women account for more than 28% of the new managing directors and senior managing directors – up from 21% in 2014. 

 

 

 

What's Happening? - Talent

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Please see below selected recent intelligence about talent. Thiis is a synthesis of major recent developments at competitors, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers.

 

June 2016

 

 

  • Three-quarters of corporate directors say they face a critical challenge aligning board talent with the company's long-term strategy, and three in five want more diversity and viewpoints on the board, according to a global survey by KPMG's Board Leadership Center. Survey respondents also identified significant barriers to refining the board's makeup, with issues ranging from the right mix of skills and overcoming "status quo" thinking to lack of formal succession plans.  

 

 

What Happened? - Talent

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Please see below pre-2016 recent intelligence about talent. Thiis is a synthesis of major recent developments at competitors, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers.

 

November 2015

 

  • In Winning the talent war: Critical success factors for consulting firms, Sourceforconsulting interviewed more than 100 job-hunting consultants and found that a huge 70% of them rate firms’ culture as one of the most important factors in choosing their next employer. While it’s not surprising that culture is important people want to like their company and their co-workers - Source was a bit surprised by just how much more important culture is relative to everything else. The second-placed factor - a good career path within the firm- was a top concern for only 55% of candidates, and money was primary factor only 54% of the time.

 

  • Consulting’s eternal war for talent has only intensified of late, found Sourceforconsulting, as rapid growth in some large markets and a need to recruit for digital skills has left many firms feeling short staffed.But perhaps the more daunting challenge comes from new sources of talent competition: whereas firms previously competed primarily among themselves and with investment banks to win the brightest recruits, they’re now facing a challenge from tech companies and start-ups, which many job seekers consider more exciting and possibly less brutal places to work.

 

In The Search for Hidden Talent Treasures, strategy+business warned that organisations looking for outside talent pay an extraordinary amount of attention to resumes. HR pores over job descriptions looking for the right words to craft compelling recruitments ads. Applicants fret as they hone their cover letters to reflect what they think the company wants. Hiring managers scour applicants’ CVs for indicators of the right skills and experience, but, too often, this is all forgotten once the hire is made.

 

 

 

What Happened? - Cybersecurity

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Please see below selected recent external intelligence about cybersecurity. This is a synthesis of major recent developments at corporates, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers.

     

    October 2016

    Source: World Economic Forum

     

    July-August-September 2016

     

    • Cybersecurity is the number one technology issue in the C-suite and boardroom.
      Many senior executives are asking what they can be doing to stem the tide of cyber-attacks on their firms. The Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by Oracle, surveyed a global panel of senior executives with responsibility for cyber-security in their organisations. While virtually all of the companies reported net increases in cyber breaches, the research identified a subset that had succeeded in reducing their rate of growth by more than half over a two-year period.
    • Deloitte's ‘Changing the game on cyber risk’ claimed to offer specific strategies to address cyber risk more comprehensively.
      As the digital landscape continues to grow more complex, and cyber criminals become more sophisticated, business leaders (not just IT), across industries, are growing more anxious. They wonder how their organisation would respond in the face of a cyberattack. They question whether they’re sufficiently anticipating and preparing for a future attack. They want to know how well their organisation could absorb and recover from an attack, how well their most important digital assets are protected.
    • Deloitte also released Beneath the surface of a cyberattack: A deeper look at business impacts, a risk-based report outlining the depth and duration of cyber incidents in financial terms. Although cybersecurity is one of the most urgent issues of our time, the resulting impact of a cyber incident is still largely unproven. Recognising the need of business leaders to have clarity around the enterprise-wide effect of such events.
    • EY's Investigation and Dispute Services launched a defence and remediation tool named Radar 360 in order to defend financial loss disruption and breach of confidential data due to malware attack from cyber criminals.
    • The cybersecurity industry is in the midst of a deals boom as private equity buyers hunt for cash-generating companies and smaller start-ups get snapped up for their technology or in-demand security engineers. The total number of exits in the cyber security industry - the vast majority of which are deals - rose by a third from 2014 to 2015, according to PrivCo, the private company research firm. In the first quarter of 2016, notable deals in the industry increased by 50 per cent from eight to 12, the firm said.
    • PwC’s Game of Threats™ – an interactive cyber breach simulation for senior executives – has launched in the UK. The head-to-head digital card game pits teams of attackers against defenders and is designed to simulate the experience that leadership teams could realistically face in the midst of a cyber-attack. With nearly three quarters of CEOs regarding cybersecurity as one of the top three risks to their organisations, along with over-regulation and geopolitical uncertainty, it’s clear that increasing cyber threats and the number of recent public breaches is moving cyber security up the list of top business priorities. But if systems were breached and time was ticking, would boards and leadership teams be ready to respond?

     

    Selected further recent developments:
     

     

     

    June 2016

     

    • Although cybersecurity is one of the most urgent issues of our time, the resulting impact of a cyber incident is still largely unproven. Recognising the need of business leaders to have clarity around the enterprise-wide effect of such events, Deloitte Advisory released 'Beneath the surface of a cyberattack: A deeper look at business impacts,' a risk-based report outlining the depth and duration of cyber incidents in financial terms.

     

    • EY's Investigation and Dispute Services launched a defence and remediation tool named Radar 360 in order to defend financial loss disruption and breach of confidential data due to malware attack from cyber criminals.

     

     

    • Cybersecurity is the number one technology issue in the C-suite and boardroom. No wonder that many senior executives are asking what they can be doing to stem the tide of cyber-attacks on their firms. The Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by Oracle, surveyed a global panel of senior executives with responsibility for cyber-security in their organisations.  While virtually all of the companies reported net increases in cyber-breaches, the research identified a subset that had succeeded in reducing their rate of growth by more than half (from 21.1% to 9.8%, or a 53% reduction) over a two year period. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    What Happened? - Risk

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    Please see below selected pre 2016 intelligence about risk. This is a synthesis of major recent developments at competitors, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers in our external environment.

     

    December 2015

     

    • Eurasia Group identified its top risks for December 2015, which included the following: despiteChina’s relaxation of the One Child Policy, the workforce will continue to shrink as the population ages, creating more urgency to transition the economy toward higher-end, innovative, and less labour intensive production and services; in Russia, the upcoming election cycle will delay difficult adjustments to tax and pension policy, putting fiscal buffers at risk; and the Conservatives’ commitment to balancing the UK’sbudget by 2020 means deep cuts for innovation and training grants, hampering efforts to address the "productivity gap" with western Europe.

     

     

     

    What Happened? - Economics

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    Please see below selected pre-2016 economics-related intelligence. This is a synthesis of major recent developments at corporates, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers.

     

    December 2015

     

    • Based on historic patterns of the business cycle, the current expansion has lasted longer than the average gap between recessions. It's prudent to start thinking about where the next recession might come from and emerging market corporate debt is a likely contender, warned the EIU. Ultra-low interest rates in the US, EU, UK and Japan have made financing conditions pretty easy for a lot of emerging market corporates in recent years, and many have taken the chance to borrow on international markets to get access to this cheap finance. In 2010-12, strong local currencies in many commodity exporters, like Brazil and Indonesia, meant that much of this borrowing was in US dollars. Companies in Latin America (especially Brazil), Turkey and South Korea are looking particularly exposed. As interest rates are now on the way up in most countries, and the US dollar is going up against most other currencies, the cost of servicing these loans is rising, and there could be some trouble in 2016. There is less to worry about in China, where little debt is denominated in foreign currency, and much lending is to and from entities that are ultimately state-backed.

     

     

    • The European Commission published its new Circular Economy Package intended to stimulate Europe's transition towards a circular economy to boost global competitiveness, foster sustainable economic growth and generate new jobs. The package consists of an EU Action Plan, a timetable setting out when the actions will be completed and a number of legislative (revised) proposals on waste, setting recycling targets. Press release

     

     

    • The latest edition of PwC's Global Economy Watch looked at whether consumers are going to behave more like Santa and less like Scrooge over the coming few months. Retail turnover suggests good news for retailers – spending on clothes, communications equipment and leisure activities is now growing faster than average spending, and the outlook is positive for 2016.

     

     

     

    What Happened? - Marketing

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    Please see below selected pre-2016 intelligence about marketing and communication. These headlines represent an objective "outside-in" synthesis of major recent developments at competitors, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers. 

     

    December 2015

     

     

    • Unified marketing impact analytics (UMIA) promises to apportion credit to all marketing activities, claimed Forrester. Marketers, under pressure to be more accountable for the financial returns of their efforts, embrace this technique, but they often find it difficult to persuade management to make what can be a significant upfront investment. Forrester aims to help customer insights professionals build the business case for UMIA by benchmarking the return on investment (ROI) it provides and outlining the costs, benefits, and risks involved to ensure a successful implementation.

     

     

    What's Happening? - Marketing

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    Please see below selected recent intelligence about marketing and communication. These headlines represent an objective "outside-in" synthesis of major recent developments at competitors, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers. 

     

    June 2016

     

     

     

     

    What Happened? - Leadership

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    Please see below selected pre-2016 intelligence about leadership. This is a synthesis of major recent developments at corporates, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers in our external environment. New content is in bold.

     

    December 2015

     

     

     

     

    What Happened? - Governance

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    Please see below selected intelligence from 2016 and earlier about governance. This is a synthesis of major recent developments at corporates, business schools, thinktanks, media, commentators, and other key influencers in our external environment. New content is in bold.

     

    June 2016

     

    • Global governance, good governance, failing governance: like so many buzzwords in the field of international development, the word has come to mean different things to different groups. So what is it, asked the World Economic Forum? In its purest form it describes the structures and decision-making processes that allow a state, organisation or group of people to conduct affairs. The most obvious among these is the government running a country, as well as the administrations and groups that ensure its safety and efficiency. But it’s not just governments that govern: institutions such as the IMF, World Bank and United Nations, for instance, have an authority that is recognised the world over. These bodies take a multilateral approach to world affairs, bringing together leaders of public and private sectors, as well as members of wider society, to achieve commonly accepted goals and tackle threats to international security. The business sector is another piece of the puzzle, mostly concerned with how companies regulate themselves and contribute to the regulation of global frameworks.

     

    • The time is up for non-executive directors, warned The Financial Times. Through successive corporate crises and systemic catastrophes, despite — and in part because of — layers of codes and regulations, independent board members have failed to do the impossible job handed to them by complacent fund managers.