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Part consultancy, part thinktank, part social enterprise, Halcyon helps you prepare for and respond to personal, organisational and societal change.

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Global

What's Changing? - Demographics

 Demographics

 

April 2018

  • The average age of Arab heads of state is currently 72, while the average age of their people is just 25, according to The Economist. Six years after the Arab Spring, that generation gap continues to fuel the sense that the region’s leaders are hopelessly out of touch with their own people. Signal Media asked whether, at 32 years old, can Saudi Arabia’s headstrong Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman change that in the region’s most hidebound kingdom?
  • Millennials have become the most dominant category in the USA overtaking the Baby Boomers (Pew, 2017)

 

March 2018

What 's Changing? - Energy
Energy
Halcyon In Business 15 April 2018

 

2018

What's Changing? - Trade
Trade
Halcyon In Business 6 April 2018

 

Please see below key recent developments concerning trade:

 

April 2018

  • China’s vulnerability on trade is not what it was. In 2006, Chinese trade amounted to 65.2 percent of GDP. In 2016, that number had fallen to just 37 percent. That’s still higher than the US (27 percent), but China now has less reason to shy away from a trade fight if its government feels it must persuade Trump that trade wars aren’t “easy to win.”

Sources: GZEROMedia

 

What's Changing? - Privacy

Privacy

 

Signal Media noted in early 2018 that the three largest economic zones on Earth differ significantly in how they treat privacy. Europe gives people the last word on how their personal data can be used – and imposes harsh penalties on rule-breakers. In China, it’s the government that has the real sovereignty over all data and information flows (Russia and Turkey are trying fitfully to do the same.)

But in the US, apart from some sector-specific exceptions such as healthcare and a general ban on deceptive trading practices, it falls to private companies to set their own privacy policies on their platforms. As Facebook and others have found out, profit-seeking, politics, and privacy don’t always fit together neatly.