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Part consultancy, part thinktank, part social enterprise, Halcyon helps you prepare for and respond to personal, organisational and societal change.

See Halcyon's unique reporting on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and contact us to discuss how we may be able to help you contribute to and/or create value from the SDGs.

Halcyon monitors, analyses and advises upon personal, organisational and societal issues and responses. Contact us to discuss how we may be able you deal with these issues and develop your own responses.

Follow Halcyon's forthcoming 52:52:52 campaign on Twitter, which will feature 52 issues and 52 responses over 52 weeks.

Halcyon Identifies

What's Changing? - Conflict

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2018

  • Our World in Data analysed conflicts in which at least one party was the government of a state and which generated more than 25 battle-related deaths are included. The data refer to direct violent deaths. Deaths due to disease or famine caused by conflict are excluded. Extra-judicial killings in custody are also excluded.

 

What's Changing? - Food

Food

 

 

Understanding food - where it comes from; how to get it to everyone who needs it in a cost-effective but sustainable way; what's healthy and what isn't - has never seemed a more urgent challenge.  Halcyon is therefore monitoring key food-related trends around the world.

 

What's Changing? - Equality
Equality
Halcyon Identifies 6 April 2018

 

Please see below the latest key developments around (in)equality.

 

2018

 

April

  • A report from the World Bank found that South Africa is the world’s most unequal country. The top 1 percent of South Africans own 70.9 percent of the nation's wealth. The bottom 60 percent of South Africans collectively control just 7 percent.

 

2017

What's Changing? - Privacy

Privacy

 

Signal Media noted in early 2018 that the three largest economic zones on Earth differ significantly in how they treat privacy. Europe gives people the last word on how their personal data can be used – and imposes harsh penalties on rule-breakers. In China, it’s the government that has the real sovereignty over all data and information flows (Russia and Turkey are trying fitfully to do the same.)

But in the US, apart from some sector-specific exceptions such as healthcare and a general ban on deceptive trading practices, it falls to private companies to set their own privacy policies on their platforms. As Facebook and others have found out, profit-seeking, politics, and privacy don’t always fit together neatly. 

What's Changing? - Language

Language

 

London boasts over 300 different spoken languages — more than any other city in the world, according to The Information Capital. The capital’s lingua franca, of course, remains English: 78% of Londoners cited it as their ‘main’ language in the 2011 Census. The other 22% speak in different tongues, including Urdu, Somali and Tagalog.

What's Changing? - Politics

Politics

"Politics is the great generaliser and literature the great particulariser" - Philip Roth

 

2018

 

March

 

There are currently about 3.3 billion people living under political systems considered autocratic, according to a report by the Bertelsmann Stiftung, a research institution. That’s the highest number registered since they began regular surveys in 2006. Still, 4.2 billion people live in democracies. 

 

What's Changing? - Happiness

Happiness

 

Can we imagine how we might all become just slightly happier, rather than trying to solve the insoluble - i.e. the perennial problem of human happiness and fulfilment?

Becoming happier is a subject that has occupied some of history's greatest thinkers, but how do we sort the good ideas from the bad? Are there any hard and fast rules when it comes to happiness, and should we trust anyone who claims to know the secret?

What's Changing? - Identity

Identity

 

Identities are always at some level imagined, believes Eurasia Group, arguing that what people choose to focus on differs widely from country to country, according to a 2017 study by Pew Research. A few findings:

  • 52% of Hungarians see place of birth as the most important attribute of national identity, while only 13% of Germans say the same.

  • 84% of Dutch say being able to speak the national language is very important to being truly part of the nation, but only 59% of Italians share this view.