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Part consultancy, part thinktank, part social enterprise, Halcyon helps you prepare for and respond to personal, organisational and societal change.

Halcyon's 52:52:52 campaign on Twitter will help you address 52 issues with 52 responses over 52 weeks.

To be a catalyst is the ambition most appropriate for those who see the world as being in constant change, and who, without thinking that they control it, wish to influence its direction - Theodore Zeldin

A Mundane Comedy is Dominic Kelleher's new book, which will be published in early 2020. We will be publishing extracts on this site and across social media during the first quarter of 2020. Please feel free to contact us with any questions about the book.

England

On Samhain

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"Sauin" is the name in Manx Gaelic of the festival marking the start of the year's dark half, celebrated from dusk on 31 October to dusk on 1 Nove,ber. In Gaelic & Irish, "Samhain"; a liminal time, marked by fire, haunting & the crossing of thresholds.

A beautiful seasonal quote from the inspiring Damh the Bard.

On Jane Austen

Jane Austen

 

Though not particularly taken by recent film adaptations of her novels, and well-used to my family calling me "Mr Bennett", I remember very much enjoying Pride and Prejudice when I read it as a student in France.

Today, Jane Austen is loved mainly as a charming guide to fashionable life in the Regency period. She is admired for portraying a world of elegant houses, dances, servants and fashionable young men driving barouches. But her own vision of her task was radically different, believes The School of Life. She was an ambitious – and stern – moralist. She was acutely conscious of human failings and she had a deep desire to make people nicer: less selfish, more reasonable, more dignified and more sensitive to the needs of others.

EDG: Enhanced Ageing

Ageing

 

This paper is an evolving examination of issues around, and responses to, the challenge or improving the lives of and caring for elders, on the emotional, mental, physical, practical, spiritual levels.

 

Pre 2018

On Exercise
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Halcyon In Kal… 29 July 2018

 

A new trendy workout in 2018 that I quite like the sound of is plogging -  which is picking up litter while you're jogging. Plogging started in Scandinavia (the word is a combination of "plocka upp," which means "pick up" in Swedish, and "jogging"), and it's gaining popularity in the US. Digital health startup Lifesum recently launched a feature that lets users track their plogging.

Why do I (try to, though not always in a very disciplined way) run, cycle, play football and tennis? Well, there are many reasons.

On Ockham's Razor

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Wade Rowland, in Ockham's Razor, argued, inter alia:

  • That a 45 year old student of his who'd lost his job was afforded little dignity, because "to be a sacrifice, you have to some intrinsic value, otherwise there is no sacrifice involved, just a shifting, a removal, a replacement". In the world of..."downsizing" and "human resources" and "outplacement"...values are banished".
  • The nineteenth century British economist Alfred Marshall said: "The economist, like everyone else, must concern himself with the ultimate aims of man." The ultimate aims. He must concern himself, in other words, with values.

 

On Silbury Hill

Way back in 1999 I registered the internet domain name silburyhill.com and paid to maintain it for several years, without ever really doing anything with it. I eventually let the registration lapse, but even now, new developments at Silbury continue to resonate in me in a way that I can't easily put into words.

Silbury Hill

Why did I feel compelled - no other word will do - to acquire silburyhill.com as my first personal URL (and why did I pay a not inconsiderable sum to hold onto the URL for a few years, despite being far from ready to launch my own website back then?)

On Arthur

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Fascinating In Our Time edition about Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. The Arthurian legend is one of the most enduring and popular in western literature, and and its characters are as well-known today as they were then; and the book's themes - chivalry, betrayal, love and honour - remain as compelling (to me, as to so many others, since childhood).

On Heroes

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Pace David Bowie, and in the light of the hagiography building in some quarters around the late Steve Jobs, one wonders who are the real enduring, beyond "just for one day" heroes, ancient and modern?

A good candidate from my childhood is Alexander the Great, from the moment I first shed a tear when reading in a Ladybird history book (a constant companion, and part of a set which I preserve with fondness and gratitude to this day) about Alexander dying (at just 33, thereby giving him a special bond with Jesus in my young mind) "far from his homeland".  As a long-standing, albeit non-heroic exile from my own homeland, this still resonates...

On Summer

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"I thought I saw a swallow land, upon my hand, on summer day" - Roy Harper

For the sensitive gardener, this is the peak of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, and the weekend following Midsummer Day is the time of quietness, and of flower festivals and of fragrant old roses around mildewed old church doors and of wandering among indecipherable gravestones and of coming hollyhocks and of lemon balm and of long, long ago memories, but always, "history is now, and England".