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Part consultancy, part thinktank, part social enterprise, Halcyon helps you prepare for and respond to personal, organisational and societal change.

Halcyon's 52:52:52 campaign on Twitter will help you address 52 issues with 52 responses over 52 weeks.

To be a catalyst is the ambition most appropriate for those who see the world as being in constant change, and who, without thinking that they control it, wish to influence its direction - Theodore Zeldin

Choices

What's Changing? - Optimism

Optimism

 

Please see below selected recent optimism-related change.

 

See also: Halcyon Optimism Headlines

 

November 2018

  • Negativity bias means that, as human beings, we experience “bad” events more intensely than we do the “good” - and we also remember them more. So we have to work hard to remain hopeful - or we can’t make things better. Yet optimism isn’t frivolous: it’s necessary, argued The Guardian, because if we feel hopeless all the time, if we’re always in crisis, the natural response is to give up and stop trying altogether. Understanding how other cultures approach life’s trials and joys may help us achieve contentment.

 

October 2018

What's Changing? - Business

Business

 

The 20th Century was about dozens of markets of millions of consumers. The 21st Century is about millions of markets of dozens of consumers - Joe Kraus, dotcom pioneer

 

Please see below selected recent business-related change.

 

See also:

On Jean-Paul Sartre

Sartre

 

Man is nothing else but that which he makes of himself. That is the first principle of existentialism

Jean-Paul Sartre introduces us to the idea of our absolute freedom. While he admits that we are limited by some physical and social circumstances, he places us utterly in charge of ourselves.

Are we "condemned" to be free, as Sartre would seem at first glance to have it, or is such freedom more, as he would perhaps really contend, an opportunity staring us in the face if only we'd pay attention?

On George Orwell

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According to Open Culture, Orwell's Animal Farm was almost never published.  The manuscript barely survived the Nazi bombing of London during World War II, and then initially T.S. Eliot (an important editor at Faber & Faber) and other publishers rejected the book.  It eventually came to see the light of day but, reportedly, Animal Farm still can’t be legally read in China, Burma and North Korea, or across large parts of the Islamic world. 

However, the Internet Archive offers free access to audio versions of Animal Farm and Orwell’s other major classic, 1984.

See also:

On "Favourite" Songs

Many evenings of my youth were spent listening to Radio Caroline's "Personal Top 30s", from 6-9pm and 9pm-midnight on Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings. My friends and I would write down, swap, be inspired by and gently criticise each others' choices, but none of us ever got round to posting ours in, and our chance vanished into the North Sea with the Mi Amigo in March 1980.

However, since 2008 I have listened almost constantly to Caroline, which plays "Personal Top 15s" every weekday at 10am CET, but again, I've not summoned the nerve to send mine in.