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Part consultancy, part thinktank, part social enterprise, Halcyon helps you prepare for and respond to personal, organisational and societal change.

Halcyon's 52:52:52 campaign on Twitter will help you address 52 issues with 52 responses over 52 weeks.

To be a catalyst is the ambition most appropriate for those who see the world as being in constant change, and who, without thinking that they control it, wish to influence its direction - Theodore Zeldin

Work

Questioning Change - Work

Work

 

Forum for the Future identified key questions regarding the future of work:

  • What kind of skills will our future workforce need? How might they be different from the skills needed today? How can educational needs and mindsets shift in response?

  • We also now need to ask, what sort of ‘talent’ will economies need? Where might the precise value in what people can do lie in future? How will this impact pensions and social security? 

  • How will we determine the rights of robots - a new class of workers?

  • What will be the future of unemployment: will more people choose it, or be in temporary/flexible/freelance employment?

  • How will team structures change? Will more people be working in teams, or alone?

What' Changing? - Balance
Balance
Halcyon Identifies 3 August 2018

 

Please see below selected recent balance-related change.

 

See also: Halcyon Balance Headlines

 

Pre 2018

On Automation

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In the distant future, no one needs to work. Energy is available wherever people can set up a solar panel, windmill, or hydro-turbine. Artificial Intelligence (AI) units, distant descendants of today’s 3D printers, are capable of producing anything a person can program into them. Just by asking, anyone can have anything they want. People trade energy credits or donate energy to projects that interest them.

See for example HBR on "Computers Create Jobs and Inequality at the Same Time".

This is the post-labour economy imagined by today’s sci-fi writers. Indeed, science fiction has been speculating on what post-labour economies might look like for more than 100 years, In a post-labour economy, people don’t need to work in order to live or access goods. In fact, work has nothing to do with wealth or value.