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Part consultancy, part thinktank, part social enterprise, Halcyon helps you prepare for and respond to personal, organisational and societal change.

See Halcyon's unique reporting on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and contact us to discuss how we may be able to help you contribute to and/or create value from the SDGs.

Halcyon monitors, analyses and advises upon personal, organisational and societal issues and responses. Contact us to discuss how we may be able you deal with these issues and develop your own responses.

Follow Halcyon's forthcoming 52:52:52 campaign on Twitter, which will feature 52 issues and 52 responses over 52 weeks.


What's Happening? - SDG 14. Life Below Water
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Halcyon In Future 7 November 2017

"And the sand-castle virtues are all swept away
In the tidal destruction, the moral melee..."
- from Thick As A Brick, Jethro Tull


This evolving paper examines progress in trying to achieve SDG 14. Life Below Water.



The oceans are in turmoil, but unfortunately most of it is out of sight and therefore out of mind. In Commodifying the Oceans, Environmental sociologist Stefano Longo explored the multiple threats to the oceans, from overfishing to coral reef collapse to ocean acidification.

What Might Happen? - 2020
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Halcyon In Future 31 October 2016



The 2010 Ten-Year Forecast Map of the Decade benchmarked the big forces that will shape the decade: The Carbon Economy; The Water Ecology; Adaptive Power; Cities in Transition and Molecular Identity.



What Might Happen? - 2025
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Halcyon In Future 31 October 2016

In 20 Forecasts for 2011-2025, World Future Society identified breakthroughs most likely to affect work, investments, and family life over the next 15 years.

What Happened? - Millennium Development Goals

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The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were eight time-bound goals providing concrete, numerical benchmarks for tackling extreme poverty in its many dimensions.

The MDGs included goals and targets on income poverty, hunger, maternal and child mortality, disease, inadequate shelter, gender inequality, environmental degradation and the Global Partnership for Development.

Adopted by world leaders in the year 2000 with the attention of being achieved by 2015, the MDGs were both global and local, tailored by each country to suit specific development needs. 

The eight MDGs below in turn broke down into 21 quantifiable targets that are measured by 60 indicators.

Goal 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

On Biomimicry
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Halcyon In Kal… 18 April 2016

Visiting Luc Schuiten's Vegetal City exhibition in Brussels back in 2009 served as an eye-opening introduction to the potential that biomimicry might play in helping us design a sustainable future.

Many projects are already underway; some young architects are designing structures made completely out of living trees, while others are imagining how our great cities might return to their more natural state.

A related website tried to organise all biological information by function and asked the question - what we can we learn from this organism (e.g. any inventor, anywhere, at the moment of creation, could ask "how does nature remove salt from water?")

On 2025 Halcyon In Future 22 October 2014

By 2025:

  • 21% of the world’s people and 39% of US citizens will buy for-profit water.1

1. The Price of Thirst, Global Water Inequality and the Coming Chaos, Karen Piper, University of Minnesota Press © 2014

On Water
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Halcyon In Kal… 22 May 2014

As global population increases and people become wealthier, agricultural production will need to likewise increase, but food systems may become more stressed because of competition for water.

Water is also used in everyday products at astounding rates - e.g. a single cup of coffee costs 130 litres of water, while about 18,900 litres are needed to produce 1 kg of roasted coffee.

According to The Ripple Effect, The Fate of Freshwater in the Twenty-First Century (Alex Prud’homme, © 2011, Scribner, a Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.):