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Part consultancy, part thinktank, part social enterprise, Halcyon helps you prepare for and respond to personal, organisational and societal change.

See Halcyon's unique reporting on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and contact us to discuss how we may be able to help you contribute to and/or create value from the SDGs.

Halcyon monitors, analyses and advises upon personal, organisational and societal issues and responses. Contact us to discuss how we may be able you deal with these issues and develop your own responses.

Follow Halcyon's forthcoming 52:52:52 campaign on Twitter, which will feature 52 issues and 52 responses over 52 weeks.


On Christmas


"Wings are for flying, not frying" ...nice quote, nice sentiment.  Animal-friendly consumerism could be a major future trend.  Until 12 years ago I too gorged myself on turkey every Christmas Day, Boxing Day, 27th...and my mouth watered long after at the remembered taste of turkey soup on the 28th or 29th, a meal which constituted one of the culinary highlights of my year.

Now, though the smell of meat still does not repulse me, some thoughtless things just can't stand up to an onslaught of values, so, all the trimmings, certainly...but no turkey (nor ham, despite the photo) for me once again this year.

On Meat


Our current meat-heavy system of food production seems to many unsustainable, a waste of resources and a source of pollution in the form of pesticides and hormones as well as methane gas from livestock manure.

On Theodore Zeldin

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Theodore Zeldin re-iterated his belief in the powerfully transformative role of conversation:

"Individuals are no longer what they used to be, each is unique. That makes a big difference to how they work. Each one is an enigma. There are six billion people whom we need to discover. We are now in the same position as the scientists of the last century, discovering the different elements and molecules of the natural world. So there is no need to feel lost or aimless. There is a wonderful adventure before us."

On Qualia

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If we're dominated and therefore de facto separated by our qualia - i.e. the the subjective quality of conscious experience - can we ever reasonably hope to reach a consensus on what should be our shared values?

On Ockham's Razor

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Wade Rowland, in Ockham's Razor, argued, inter alia:

  • That a 45 year old student of his who'd lost his job was afforded little dignity, because "to be a sacrifice, you have to some intrinsic value, otherwise there is no sacrifice involved, just a shifting, a removal, a replacement". In the world of..."downsizing" and "human resources" and "outplacement"...values are banished".
  • The nineteenth century British economist Alfred Marshall said: "The economist, like everyone else, must concern himself with the ultimate aims of man." The ultimate aims. He must concern himself, in other words, with values.


On Philosophy

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If, as I once read somewhere, the big questions are: 1. How was the world created? 2. Is there any will or meaning behind the world? Is there life after death? and 4. How ought we to live?, then as I've got older I've increasingly found number 4. by far the most interesting and important.

See also:

Imagining values-driven businesses

A professor and former dean at the Saïd Business School at Oxford University argued in a 2013 book that corporations should restructure around three key principles:

  • First, articulate clear values: why does the company exist, and what does it believe in?
  • Second, appoint “trustees” to protect the interests of stakeholders and uphold the values of the corporation.
  • Third, restrict voting shares to long-term investors - and he also believes that governments should use the corporate tax system to encourage “public values by private corporations”.