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We actively monitor change covering more than 150 key elements of life.

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What's Changing? - Civility

Civility

 

Please see below selected recent civility-related change.

 

See also:

 

September 2021

 

June 2021

  • Exponential View warned of an increasing “degroundedness” in modern notions of citizenship. The pressure of globalised capitalism and the erosion of critical pillars of citizenship like voting or even knowledge of a country’s political history led the economist Branko Milanovic to ask the rather provocative question: Is citizenship just a rent? The last vestiges of citizenship, in Milanovic’s view, are confined to a stream of income (in the form of benefits) and advantages that “one receives if lucky to have been born or become a citizen of a rich nation”.

 

February 2021

  • The global Microsoft Digital Civility Index (DCI) improved in 2020, bouncing back from its lowest reading in four years, even as Covid-19 upended the world. A feeling of solidarity during the pandemic among people in some regions, as well as responsible online interactions by teenagers in particular, helped drive the index's three-point recovery.

 

December 2020

  • There is increasing pressure on companies to use their power and profits to engage with social and political causes. In doing so, companies can help to support the ‘shared civic space’ that enables the private sector and civil society organisations to benefit from a society that respects the rule of law and human rights, at a time when many of these rights are under threat around the world, but as demonstrated by corporate responses to the BLM protests in 2020, there is a danger of corporate activism being perceived as ‘lip service’ rather than genuinely addressing the negative impacts of business operations on civic space, warned Chatham House.

 

September 2020

  • Emerging technologies and digital tools have created new possibilities for inclusive and democratic civic participation and engagement in recent years. Online platforms, internet providers and software designers have provided important channels for individuals to exercise their rights to freedom of expression, freedom of assembly and freedom from discrimination. Online civic space is increasingly important for civil society actors operating under repressive governments, and tech companies form a highly influential group in the protection and support of such actors. There are already numerous examples of such support from large tech firms. For example, Mozilla recently announced a fund to support black artists exploring the effects of AI on racial justice, and Microsoft offered free protection for human rights organisations under increased threat of cyber-attack during COVID-19. Yet the tech sector also presents unique threats to civic space in the form of privacy violations and enabling of state surveillance, microtargeting using personal data, instances of hate speech and extremism, as well as misinformation and disinformation (particularly concerning during election campaigns and health crises), warned Chatham House.

 

March 2020

  • Microsoft's Digital Civility Index stood at 70% in 2020, the highest reading of perceived online incivility since the survey began in 2016, and the first time the DCI had reached the 70th percentile. Moreover, the equally troubling trends of emotional and psychological pain ­– and negative consequences that follow online-risk exposure – both also increased significantly. Physical appearance and politics are the primary drivers of online incivility, with 31% of all respondents pointing to both of these two topics as problematic. Sexual orientation was close behind at 30%, while religion and race came in at 26% and 25% respectively. On the plus side, according to this latest study, people seemed encouraged by the advent of the new decade and what the 2020s may hold in terms of improved online civility among all age groups.

 

February 2020

  • Microsoft's Digital Civility Index stood at 70% in 2020, the highest reading of perceived online incivility since the survey began in 2016, and the first time the DCI has reached the 70th percentile. Moreover, the equally troubling trends of emotional and psychological pain ­– and negative consequences that follow online-risk exposure – both also increased significantly. Physical appearance and politics are the primary drivers of online incivility, with 31% of all respondents pointing to both of these two topics as problematic. Sexual orientation was close behind at 30%, while religion and race came in at 26% and 25% respectively. 

 

December 2019

 

July 2019

 

May 2019

  • A lot of attention has been given to the negative consequences of social media on the human psyche, noted Big Think. Likewise, specific and long overdue workplace issues are under dissection: gender discrimination and sexual harassment, fair pay, and surviving in the gig economy. One lesser discussed yet pervasive topic is now being looked at: incivility. Given all of the incivility in social media, that it seeps into our workplace is not surprising; it was there long before we could tweet out unthinking nonsense at strangers. In some ways we're becoming, by the day, a less empathetic culture. A study published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, pinpointed one major issue arising from rudeness at work: sleep problems.

 

April 2019

  • Many claim everyone should be treated equally. Yet many (perhaps most) also think we are right to care most about our family, our friends and our lovers, and 82% of charitable donations in the UK are given to the causes closest to home. Should we therefore just accept that our ethics are in practice tribal, or is a universal concern for humanity the bedrock of a civilised culture, asked the Institute of Art and Ideas. 

 

February 2019

  • Ignoring communications such as email is an act of incivility, as being overwhelmed by volume is no excuse to snub a colleague, claimed Quartz.

 

December 2018

 

November 2018

 

October 2018

  • Civility can be dangerous if hijacked for political agendas: many have, for example, expressed concerns about China's grand ambitions for a “social credit system” that would reward and punish citizens based on what their on- and offline behaviour tells the state about their "civic virtues".

 

September 2018

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