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We actively monitor change covering more than 150 key elements of life.

A Mundane Comedy is Dom Kelleher's new book. Extracts will appear on this site and across social media from late 2021. Please get in touch with any questions or thoughts.

The 52:52:52 project, launching both on this site and on Twitter in late 2021 will help you address 52 issues with 52 responses over 52 weeks.

Water

What Counts? - Water

Water

 

In 2000, as part of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) the world pledged to half to share of people without access to an improved water source by 2015 from 1990 levels. The world surpassed this target by 2010, increasing access to 91 percent by 2015. Globally, 2.6 billion people gained access over this period — more than a third of the world's population have gained access to improved water since 1990, according to Our World in Data. The progress over this 25-year period is shown by region in the chart below, as the share of the population who have gained access since 1990.

Access to improved water sources is increasing across the world, rising from 76 percent of the global population in 1990 to 91 percent in 2015, according to Our World in Data.

Billions more can now drink safely Halcyon In Figures 1 January 2020

Billions More Can Now Drink Safely

On the Millennium Development Goals

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The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were eight time-bound goals providing concrete, numerical benchmarks for tackling extreme poverty in its many dimensions.

The MDGs included goals and targets on income poverty, hunger, maternal and child mortality, disease, inadequate shelter, gender inequality, environmental degradation and the Global Partnership for Development.

Adopted by world leaders in the year 2000 with the attention of being achieved by 2015, the MDGs were both global and local, tailored by each country to suit specific development needs. 

The eight MDGs below in turn broke down into 21 quantifiable targets that were measured by 60 indicators.

On Biomimicry
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Halcyon In Kal… 18 April 2016

Visiting Luc Schuiten's Vegetal City exhibition in Brussels back in 2009 served as an eye-opening introduction to the potential that biomimicry might play in helping us design a sustainable future.

Many projects are already underway; some young architects are designing structures made completely out of living trees, while others are imagining how our great cities might return to their more natural state.

A related website tried to organise all biological information by function and asked the question - what we can we learn from this organism (e.g. any inventor, anywhere, at the moment of creation, could ask "how does nature remove salt from water?")

Quote 3004

When the well's dry, we'll know the value of water- Benjamin Franklin

Quote 2989

You don't drown by falling in water; you only drown if you stay there - Zig Ziglar

Quote 2988

When the well?s dry, we?ll know the value of water- Benjamin Franklin