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Part consultancy, part thinktank, part social enterprise, Halcyon helps you prepare for and respond to personal, organisational and societal change.

Halcyon's forthcoming 52:52:52 campaign on Twitter will help you address 52 issues with 52 responses over 52 weeks.

To be a catalyst is the ambition most appropriate for those who see the world as being in constant change, and who, without thinking that they control it, wish to influence its direction - Theodore Zeldin

Water

What Counts? - Water
Water
Halcyon In Figures 24 July 2018

 

In 2000, as part of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) the world pledged to half to share of people without access to an improved water source by 2015 from 1990 levels. The world surpassed this target by 2010, increasing access to 91 percent by 2015. Globally, 2.6 billion people gained access over this period — more than a third of the world's population have gained access to improved water since 1990, according to Our World in Data. The progress over this 25-year period is shown by region in the chart below, as the share of the population who have gained access since 1990.

Access to improved water sources is increasing across the world, rising from 76 percent of the global population in 1990 to 91 percent in 2015, according to Our World in Data.

Halcyon Water Headlines Halcyon Identifies 6 June 2018

Halcyon curates the most significant water-related content. Please contact us if you'd like our help with water-related challenges.

What Really Happened? -The 2010s
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Halcyon In Future 31 October 2016

The Institute for the Future published a Ten-Year Forecast in 2010 that it claimed would be a benchmark forecast for the next decade, focusing on five driving themes:

What Happened? - Millennium Development Goals
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Halcyon Impacts 19 October 2016

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were eight time-bound goals providing concrete, numerical benchmarks for tackling extreme poverty in its many dimensions.

The MDGs included goals and targets on income poverty, hunger, maternal and child mortality, disease, inadequate shelter, gender inequality, environmental degradation and the Global Partnership for Development.

Adopted by world leaders in the year 2000 with the attention of being achieved by 2015, the MDGs were both global and local, tailored by each country to suit specific development needs. 

The eight MDGs below in turn broke down into 21 quantifiable targets that are measured by 60 indicators.

Goal 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

On Biomimicry

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Visiting Luc Schuiten's Vegetal City exhibition in Brussels back in 2009 served as an eye-opening introduction to the potential that biomimicry might play in helping us design a sustainable future.

Many projects are already underway; some young architects are designing structures made completely out of living trees, while others are imagining how our great cities might return to their more natural state.

A related website tried to organise all biological information by function and asked the question - what we can we learn from this organism (e.g. any inventor, anywhere, at the moment of creation, could ask "how does nature remove salt from water?")

On 2025 Halcyon In Future 22 October 2014

By 2025:

  • 21% of the world’s people and 39% of US citizens will buy for-profit water.1

1. The Price of Thirst, Global Water Inequality and the Coming Chaos, Karen Piper, University of Minnesota Press © 2014

Quote 3004

When the well's dry, we'll know the value of water- Benjamin Franklin

halcyon.admin 17 June 2013